a

Blade is a smooth and charming, visually stunning and very malleable and flexible

© Copyright Qode Interactive

Get the Message Out on MSDs: National Safety Month Week 4

This article was originally published by Chris Kilbourne on the Safety Daily Advisor Blog.

Every June, the National Safety Council (NSC) celebrates National Safety Month “to educate and influence behaviors around leading causes of preventable injuries and deaths.” So this month, the Friday Safety Daily Advisor will participate by giving you training information and resources on each weekly theme.

NSM’s overall theme this year is “Safety Starts with Me,” which is the principle that everyone in the workplace is responsible for safety, not just management or safety professionals. So It’s important to train your employees on how to stay safe.

To that end, today’s Advisor gives you information you can use next week to train workers on wellness in conjunction with National Safety Month’s Week Four theme: Ergonomics

Here’s a training exercise adapted from BLR®’s PowerPoint® training session, “Ergonomics—Industrial,” that you can use next week as part of ergonomics training.

NSM’s overall theme this year is “Safety Starts with Me,” which is the principle that everyone in the workplace is responsible for safety, not just management or safety professionals. So It’s important to train your employees on how to stay safe.

To that end, today’s Advisor gives you information you can use next week to train workers on wellness in conjunction with National Safety Month’s Week Four theme: Ergonomics

Here’s a training exercise adapted from BLR®’s PowerPoint® training session, “Ergonomics—Industrial,” that you can use next week as part of ergonomics training.

Exercise Objective: Understand what type of health problems may be ergonomics-related and when to seek a medical evaluation.

Instructions: Either individually or in groups, answer the items below:

  1. List workplace risk factors for ergonomics and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs).

    ______________________________________________

  2. What is the importance of reporting risk factors and MSDs?

    _______________________________________________

Guidance

  1. The following are important risk factors for MSDs, especially when they occur at high levels and in combination.
  • Awkward postures. Body postures determine which joints and muscles are used in an activity and the amount of force or stresses that are generated or tolerated.
  • Forceful exertions (including lifting, pushing, and pulling). Tasks that require forceful exertions place higher loads on the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and joints, and may also lead to musculoskeletal problems when there is inadequate time for rest or recovery.
  • Repetitive motions. If motions are repeated frequently (e.g., every few seconds) and for prolonged periods, such as on an 8-hour shift, fatigue and muscle-tendon strain can accumulate.
  • Duration. Job tasks that require use of the same muscles or motions for long durations increase the likelihood of both localized and general fatigue.
  • Contact stresses. Repeated or continuous contact with hard or sharp objects such as nonrounded desk edges or unpadded, narrow tool handles may create pressure over one area of the body (e.g., the forearm or sides of the fingers) that can inhibit nerve function and blood flow.
  • Vibration. Exposure to local vibration occurs when a specific part of the body comes in contact with a vibrating object, such as a power hand tool. Exposure to whole-body vibration can occur while standing or sitting in vibrating environments or while using objects, such as when operating heavy-duty vehicles or large machinery.
  • Other conditions. Workplace conditions that can influence the presence and magnitude of the risk factors for MSDs can include:
    • Cold temperatures,
    • Insufficient pauses and rest breaks for recovery,
    • Machine-paced work, and
    • Unfamiliar or new work.
  1. Early reporting allows corrective measures to be implemented before the effects of a job problem worsen. Worker complaints that certain jobs cause undue physical fatigue, stress, or discomfort may be signs of ergonomic problems. Following up on these reports, particularly reports of MSDs, is essential. Such reports indicate a need to evaluate the jobs to identify any ergonomic risk factors that may contribute to the cause of the symptoms or disorders.

For more information on National Safety Month, visit NSC’s website.

Why It Matters

  • According to the Occupational Safety and Health Association (OSHA), nearly 2 million U.S. workers report work-related MSDs every year.
  • At least 375,000 of these injuries require workers to take time off from work to recover.
  • Avoid these statistics by getting the message out about how to prevent MSDs.